Creative Space with Jennifer Logue

Making the Most of What You Have as an Artist

January 21, 2024 Jennifer Logue
Creative Space with Jennifer Logue
Making the Most of What You Have as an Artist
Show Notes Transcript

On today's episode of Creative Space, we're exploring the importance of making the most of what we have as artists. There's an unexpected alchemy that happens when we work within our means, and what we think of as limitations can transform into opportunities for innovation and authenticity.  I'll share how embracing simplicity in tools and approach not only rekindles our love for the craft but also leads to art that is unmistakably 'you'.

This episode is a solo journey—no guests, just us and a conversation about why scarcity can be platform for our next breakthrough and growth. We'll touch on five powerful reasons why working with what’s already at your fingertips can be your artistic edge. From the beauty of a single voice and instrument to breaking free from the shackles of perfectionism, we're looking at the ways constraints can spur us to deepen our skills, appreciate our journey, and produce work that has an individual stamp of originality. So, grab your notepad (or that guitar you've been neglecting), and prepare to be inspired by the art of doing more with less.

For more on me, your host and creative coach, visit: jenniferlogue.com.

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Jennifer Logue:

Hello everyone and welcome to another episode of Creative Space, a podcast where we explore, learn and grow in creativity together. I'm your host, jennifer Loge, and today we're going to talk about making the most of what you have as an artist. As artists, we often find ourselves yearning for more resources, better equipment or a larger workspace to bring our creative vision to life. And while this is natural, there's so much value in learning how to make the most of what you have already. In fact, the limitations we face could become a source of inspiration for our next piece of work, or they can make our work stand out. I'll use myself as an example here. If you've been listening to the podcast, you know that I got back on the road to making music again, and I've been taking it in steps. I've been taking it in baby steps. The first step was to start working with a vocal coach, and I've been doing that since May of last year. But then the next step for me was writing songs again, and I have this vision of producing my own music at a high level. And, of course, apart from starting a music production course, I just went all in and I started researching all of the equipment that I needed to do this. The thing is, I already have the equipment enough to get started at least Not the newest version or the fanciest version of things that I need. But I hit pause on going equipment crazy and I got back to basics. I got back to the guitar and the piano. Some of my favorite songs are simple just one voice and one instrument. I decided that my next step should be working on the craft of songwriting and using the piano that I already have, the guitar I already have and the mic that I use to record this podcast that I already have. For this next step, if I have a song that needs more, I can reach out to some producers that I know to see if they would collaborate. Maybe you can relate to this in your own medium. Maybe there's a film you're writing and you feel overwhelmed because you don't have access to the top of the line cameras and instead of seeing that as an obstacle to overcome, can you work it into the film's aesthetic? There are countless other examples I could give, but I think most creatives can relate to thinking so big that we get ourselves stuck on all the things we don't have rather than focusing on what we do have. But here are a few reasons why making the most of what we have already is good for us and is good for our art. Number one it helps us embrace constraints. Constraints are not obstacles. They are the boundaries within which our creativity can flourish. Consider the constraints as the edge of your canvas, defining that space where your imagination takes flight. Limited resources force you to think outside the box, pushing you to innovate and find new ways to express your ideas. Number two it helps us in cultivating resourcefulness. Making the most of what you have nurtures resourcefulness, a skill that's indispensable for any artist. When we're faced with constraints, we are compelled to explore unconventional techniques, repurpose materials and discover the beauty in limitations. Resourcefulness not only enhances our ability to adapt, but also helps us transform challenges into opportunities for artistic exploration. Number three it helps us foster appreciation. Acknowledging and utilizing the resources at our disposal fosters a deep sense of appreciation. Whether it's a humble sketchbook, a basic paint set or a single instrument, recognizing the intrinsic value of our tools elevates the significance of our creative process. When we make the most of what we have, it just instills such a profound gratitude for the journey and reminds us that this whole thing's about the journey and not the destination. Number four it makes your art uniquely you. The tools and resources that you have available to you are part of your story. The skillset you currently have is part of your story, and all of these ingredients come together to produce the art that only you can create. Authenticity thrives in simplicity. By working with the tools and resources available to you right here and right now, you strip away unnecessary layers, allowing your true artistic voice to emerge. Making the most of what you have enables you to craft art that's genuine, raw and deeply personal. Number five it helps us overcome perfectionism. Perfectionism hinders artistic expression. The pursuit of ideal conditions or really fancy tools can become a barrier to creation. Making the most of what you have already, right here and right now, encourages you to embrace imperfections, seeing them not as flaws but unique elements that contribute to the richness of your work. When it comes to creativity, it's not about the abundance of resources, but the richness of the heart and soul behind it. Making the most of what you have is a testament to resilience, resourcefulness and a commitment to the authentic expression of your artistic voice. So let the constraints be your guide and watch as your creativity flourishes within the beautiful limitations that are uniquely yours. Now I want to know what you think. How have you made the most of what you have as an artist? Have you ever let what you don't have keep you from creating? Send me a message at Jennifer Loge on social media. I'd love to hear about your experience. And that's all I have for this episode of Creative Space. My name is Jennifer Loge. Until next time.